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Jonathan Shell joins Pegasus Institute as Director of State Initiatives

Pegasus Institute is proud to announce that Jonathan Shell, the outgoing Majority Leader of the Kentucky House of Representatives will join us as the Director of State Initiatives. In his new capacity, Jonathan will work to expand our footprint statewide allowing us to focus even more on local policy issues and strengthening relationships with local officials. Prior to joining Pegasus Institute, Shell was the youngest member of the Kentucky General Assembly and elected the first Republican House Majority Leader in state history at the age of 28. He represented District 71 which covers Garrard, Rockcastle, and a portion of Madison Counties. He holds a bachelors degree from Eastern Kentucky Un

Some Counties Release less than 10% of Defendants Pretrial, New Study Shows.

In December of 2017, the Boyle and Mercer County Fiscal Courts, commissioned a report on what improvements they could make to their criminal justice system. Boyle and Mercer county share a jail, the Boyle County Detention Center, and at the time of the commissioned report, it’s population was 181% of design capacity. The report, produced by consultants Brandstetter Carroll Inc. was released on November 8 of this year and highlights a number of proposed improvements to the local criminal justice system in Boyle and Mercer counties, with a particular focus on jail crowding. According to the report, "[t]he jail is greatly bloated by three factors: (1) Very slow felony case processing, (2) An ap

4-3 Ruling on Right to Work a Victory, but . . .

“There oughta be a law!” was a syndicated newspaper cartoon that ran from the 1940s through the 1980s. The basic premise involved the characters encountering some perceived misfortune or injustice with the remedy and punchline often being; “there ought to be a law!” I heard once, though I can’t remember where or who said it, that the 21st Century equivalent of “There oughta be a law!” was “Unconstitutional!” Any policy dispute or perceived injustice in law could be beaten by a simple argument; unconstitutional! Here in Kentucky, no debate better exemplifies this tendency than the challenging of 2017’s Right to Work law as, you guessed it, unconstitutional. The economic case for Right to Work

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